Piano Yoga

Yoga is a physical, mental and spiritual practice that dates back thousands of years. It’s based on an ancient Indian body of knowledge and stems from a Sanskrit word that means to “unite or integrate.”  Practiced world-wide today it strives to harmonize and strengthen body and mind through a variety of breathing techniques, physical postures and meditation. It’s both healing and calming as well as physically strengthening.

Its transformative power changed Arash’s life.

“I’m a different person now,” he says with a smile. “I’m a lot more calm and grounded and more fit physically. Negative elements no longer affect me. We are all exposed to negativity, be it illness, work or relationships. We all need healing. That is what yoga has done for me in the challenges I have had to face. As has my music.”

The tranquility and insight of yoga that have enriched his life are gifts he is now passionate about sharing with others by introducing his music into the intimate environment of group yoga practice.

The inspiration for this novel approach came about spontaneously during his own group yoga practice when in an impromptu moment, he improvised a few minutes of tranquil music during Savasana, the time of relaxation at the end of the class. Savasana is the final posture of yoga practice when the participants lie on the mat in a neutral position with eyes closed, giving time to allow the body to process the benefits of the practice.

Participants could physically feel the piano’s vibrations through the floor. Some were moved to tears.

“It touches people,” Arash says. “Music helps create a place of spiritual mindfulness and tranquility, opening the heart and healing both body and soul.”

Arash plays the piano at the first official Sacred Space event.

Arash performs at the “Soul Revival Prana Party”, a special yoga event with live music bringing together many of Toronto’s yoga teachers and practitioners.